Court finds teenagers carried out hacking spree

Security
  • This is nuts. Not only did a bunch of teenagers hack into some of the best defended networks in the world, but the UK authorities allowed one individual to do this three times - despite arresting him in the first instance then bailing him - for him to do the same again - TWICE.

    The legal system in the UK is a joke. The computer misuse act alone should have been enough to detain him pending trial, and yet, they released him and allowed him to continue??

    https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-66549159

    Now, admittedly, there is an art form here that should be leveraged and understood in order for organizations to better arm themselves against future attacks. If juveniles are able to break their way into high profile organizations, then this would literally be kindergarten for an experienced nefarious actor.

    It seems that high profile companies will continue to remain targets while they focus more effort on profits than user vulnerability. According to the article, the attackers bombarded employees with access requests and some approved this access as a way of making it stop!

    There are several extremely valuable lessons that can be learned from these events - one of them being able to determine the level of risk posed by an individual - which it seems that the UK authorities completely failed to do.

    More on the recently updated Computer Misuse Act can be found below

    https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/review-of-the-computer-misuse-act-1990/review-of-the-computer-misuse-act-1990-consultation-and-response-to-call-for-information-accessible


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    Hello there! Yesterday, I visited IKEA and connected to public Wi-Fi. Google and other websites worked as expected, but when I tried to access my own website, it didn’t load for some reason. I received an HSTS error and had to switch to mobile data to access my site.

    I understand we can’t just turn off HSTS since we already said browsers that we will use HSTS for next 12 months

    I’ve been using these cloudflare settings for the past two years. If there are any adjustments that need to be made to ensure my site functions in public Wi-Fi areas, please let me know.

    3b60d995-88a1-4d76-9755-a82464675f32-image.png

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    It’s not often that I post anything on LinkedIn, but the post below caught my eye, and raised an eyebrow (to say the least) when I read it.

    Screenshot_2023-08-24-20-39-47-54_254de13a4bc8758c9908fff1f73e3725.jpg

    I typically remain impassive and neutral to most of these types of post as they are usually aimed at selling you something. However, the frankly absurd security advice here being offered was so bad, I found it hard to ignore and posted the below response

    Forgive me if I decide not to take any of your cyber security advice as all of the points you’ve raised are the entire point of phishing exercises. Do you really think a nefarious actor isn’t going to send emails that look just like this (mostly because they have succeeded elsewhere as others have highlighted)?

    Your profile states that you are the leader of a world class cyber security team, yet you offer really bad advice like this? This is exactly how all cyber security campaigns work and their effectiveness is blatantly obvious by the screenshot you posted.

    “Hurt feelings” are irrelevant when you are measuring the effectiveness of your cyber security program. As the primary defense in any organization, the security department needs to be in a position to detect and repel as many attacks as possible. The paradigm here being that an organization needs to stop thousands of these attacks getting through per day (probably way more) yet an attacker only needs one link to be clicked for their campaign to succeed.

    Employee security awareness should in fact be everything that the original poster claims it shouldn’t be. Just look at the success rate of previous campaigns which any decent training program is based on.

    The bottom line here is that I really don’t understand the reasoning for the original post. This guy claims to be the leader of a world class cyber security team, yet he decides to give poor advice like this?

    Speechless. And this is a so called professional?? We’re all doomed 😱

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    @DownPW 🙂 most of this really depends on your desired security model. In all cases with firewalls, less is always more, although it’s never as clear cut as that, and there are always bespoke ports you’ll need to open periodically.

    Heztner’s DDoS protection is superior, and I know they have invested a lot of time, effort, and money into making it extremely effective. However, if you consider that the largest ever DDoS attack hit Cloudflare at 71m rps (and they were able to deflect it), and each attack can last anywhere between 8-24 hours which really depends on how determined the attacker(s) is/are, you can never be fully prepared - nor can you trace it’s true origin.

    DDoS attacks by their nature (Distributed Denial of Service) are conducted by large numbers of devices whom have become part of a “bot army” - and in most cases, the owners of these devices are blissfully unaware that they have been attacked and are under command and control from a nefarious resource. Given that the attacks originate from multiple sources, this allows the real attacker to observe from a distance whilst concealing their own identity and origin in the process.

    If you consider the desired effect of DDoS, it is not an attempt to access ports that are typically closed, but to flood (and eventually overwhelm) the target (such as a website) with millions of requests per second in an attempt to force it offline. Victims of DDoS attacks are often financial services for example, with either extortion or financial gain being the primary objective - in other words, pay for the originator to stop the attack.

    It’s even possible to get DDoS as a service these days - with a credit card, a few clicks of a mouse and a target IP, you can have your own proxy campaign running in minutes which typically involves “booters” or “stressers” - see below for more

    https://heimdalsecurity.com/blog/ddos-as-a-service-attacks-what-are-they-and-how-do-they-work

    @DownPW said in Setting for high load and prevent DDoS (sysctl, iptables, crowdsec or other):

    in short if you have any advice to give to secure the best.

    It’s not just about DDos or firewalls. There are a number of vulnerabilities on all systems that if not patched, will expose that same system to exploit. One of my favourite online testers which does a lot more than most basic ones is below

    https://www.immuniweb.com/websec/

    I’d start with the findings reported here and use that to branch outwards.

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    In the news today

    https://news.sky.com/story/briton-pleads-guilty-to-hacking-stars-twitter-accounts-to-steal-bitcoin-12877404

    If proof was ever needed that social engineering attacks are incredibly effective, yet usually very simplistic in nature, then here it is. And the mount of money extorted for a low effort ratio is truly astonishing.

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    No response from OP so marking as closed

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    @crazycells this perhaps? 🙂

    terminator_endoskeleton_1020.webp

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    @DownPW yeah, I seem to spend a large amount of my time trying to educate people that there’s no silver bullet when it comes to security.

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    @crazycells yes. I’m guessing the regulators here are the SEC.